Milo Baon

Milo Baon

Milo Baon studied Fine Arts in Madrid, a decision in which they had a lot to do with the painter Gerardo Pita, a key figure of hyperrealism in our country, and whom they considers their mentor because they encouraged them to paint. "I was lucky that he was a close friend of my parents," they explain, "and I spent the summers with him. They were the one who realized that for me this was not a whim and that, moreover, I was good at it." And the rest fell flat with the support of their parents, because "the goal was always that with one profession or another she would enjoy and be happy ". They now paint with screwdrivers, which do not touch the canvas, and achieves a creative sense of illusion. Up close the painting could seem like an abstract work because of the colors and strokes, but from a distance a realistic and perfectly defined image appears. "I have always been a bit anchored to the subject of realism and hyperrealism, due to the influence of Gerardo, although I also like Pollock a lot and American expressionism catches my attention.

 

"I love painting portraits, but my obsession is my hands. I was born deaf, I had lost 70% of my hearing and had to operate seven times to regain my hearing. And my way of communicating was my hands. Now they are also my work tool and my way of expressing myself. I've always been obsessed with my hands and when I get a little wide sleeve, I throw for the hands. Also objects or whatever they ask of me, although there are things that I do not recommend with this technique. The bigger the picture the easier it is to paint. Dripping is more realistic, and requires a little more detail, and the smaller the painting the more it blurs, the color just blends in. I try to get to know the person, talk to them to see what they like, to connect. Sometimes people come with a certain idea or they ask you for things similar to the ones you have done, but other times they simply want something for a specific space and they allow themselves to be advised. Inspiration comes from knowing the person, it helps me. But there are those who have asked me for a face, a portrait, and have ended up buying some feet; I never close myself to an idea. I really like working for people who give you a field, who trust your criteria so much that they tell you: "Do what you want." There are clients who have already become friends, and that makes the whole process easier. But I don't have a favorite painting. I always tell my mother: "One more child is leaving me." Sometimes I even have a hard time getting them out of the studio, I miss them. Many years ago I made a portrait of a person with Alzheimer's, 'The lost' is called. It is a dark, gloomy painting, with a rather sad message, with completely lost eyes in which you notice that the person is not, but on a sentimental level, it is a special work because two years ago my father was diagnosed with the disease. It is a painting that I have a lot in mind, I keep seeing it and it continues to impact me. Nor would I ever sell it."

Read More

Artwork

Loading...

GET IN TOUCH

1400 Hi Line Dr. #122
Dallas, TX 75207
USA

Open from

Tuesday–Saturday: 10am – 6pm
Closed Sunday–Monday
 

We are also available for private showings.

QUICK LINKS

SUBSCRIBE

1400 Hi Line Dr. #122
Dallas, TX 75207
USA
Copyright © 2022, Art Gallery Websites by ArtCloudCopyright © 2022, Art Gallery Websites by ArtCloud